Brown social scientist wins prestigious Bradley Prize

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Glenn Loury, a professor of social sciences, economics and international and public affairs at Brown University, has won the 2022 Bradley Prize, a prestigious award given each year by the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation.

The $250,000 prize is given to notable leaders whose accomplishments reflect the Bradley Foundation’s mission to restore, strengthen and protect the principles and institutions of American exceptionalism. Past winners include former Florida governor and 2016 presidential candidate Jeb Bush; Bill Kristol, founder and editor of the Weekly Standard; and Hernando de Soto, founder of Peru’s Institute for Liberty and Democracy.

Loury is one of just three prize winners this year. The prize selection committee will present Loury with an award at the 18th annual Bradley Prizes ceremony on Tuesday, May 17, at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C.

“I am delighted to have been honored by the Bradley Foundation with one of this year’s Bradley Prizes,” Loury said. “It reflects a welcome recognition of work that I have been doing as a scholar and public intellectual over the past 40 years. I take pride in being included among the many conservative luminaries whose intellectual contributions to the defense of the idea of American exceptionalism have been recognized by the foundation. My plan is to use the cash award to underwrite my continuing efforts to influence the intellectual climate in our country to that same effect.”

As a professor within Brown’s Department of Economics and Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Loury’s scholarship focuses on welfare economics, income distribution, game theory, industrial organization and natural resource economics. He is a prominent social critic and public intellectual, frequently speaking and writing about issues of racial inequality and social policy. Before coming to Brown, Loury taught at Boston, Harvard and Northwestern universities, becoming the first Black tenured professor of economics in Harvard’s history at age 33. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Economics Association, among other academic and research organizations. He is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a contributing editor at the Boston Review and a former longtime contributor at the New Republic.

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“Glenn is one of our country’s most influential and highly regarded academic economists, whose work has been extensively published, shared and honored by prominent organizations nationally and abroad,” said Bradley Foundation President Rick Graber. “Glenn also stands out for promoting viewpoint diversity within the academy, challenging the progressive narrative on race and inequality, and vigorously defending America’s founding principles. The Bradley Foundation is proud to honor Glenn for his scholarship and courage of conviction.”

Founded in 1985, the Milwaukee-based Bradley Foundation supports organizations that strengthen families and communities, inform and educate citizens, advance economic growth and encourage self-reliance. Its approach to philanthropy is guided by fidelity to the Constitution, commitment to free markets and dedication to the formation of informed, capable and self-governing citizens.